Be careful, Allergy Drug Consumption Can Make Fat

Allergies can occur in anyone, even into adulthood are still many people who do not realize that if he has allergies. Do you have allergies? If yes, you should be wary because a new study reveals that allergies and weight have interdependent relationships.

When allergy recurrence, most patients will take medication to eliminate the effects of allergies. But actually this way has the side effect to the body. In August 2010, researchers from Yale University published in the journal Obesity that people who take allergy medications such as antihistamines regularly higher weight than who do not eat.

This data is taken from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2005 to 2006 to compare the weight of 867 adults with antihistamine use them. The most commonly used drug in this study is a type of cetirizine, zyrtec and fexofenadine. But researchers caution that the study is observational and can not really show whether the use of antihistamines cause weight gain in people with allergies.

Another study by the same CDC data in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in 2009 found that the number of people with allergies, especially food allergies, more numerous in obese children compared with children of normal weight.

“From these results, it remains unclear how exactly the relationship between the two, whether obesity causes allergies or not,” said Cynthia Visness, Ph.D., lead author and research scientist at Rho Inc.

But unfortunately, not a lot of literature that describes how the relationship between obesity and allergies, so the explanation that there could only be seen from the results of these 2 studies.

“Inflammation can also be triggers. Fat cells release cytokines, chemicals that cause inflammation, and allergies also trigger inflammation. So people with high levels of inflammation in their bodies tend to experience these two conditions,” said Visness.

Another theory from Yale University study stated that histamine, which is a nerve conductor when there is contact with allergens, has a role in regulating appetite. Research on mice suggests histamine reduces appetite, while antihistamines increase appetite.

Therefore, researchers believe it is possible if you take an antihistamine in the long run will make you eat more. Some antihistamines substances used even as an appetite stimulant in children.